Friday, 9 April 2021

Calming music

My tastes in music have changed slightly these days, but while I still like classic music, I now find, that I also like things like Freddie Mercury and Queen,, along with Rick Wakeman, and many others that would have been classed as rock or heavy metal.

Although these have been around a long time, it was not my sort of taste, which seems very strange

However, I have noticed that although I loved to listen to classical music during the night if I wake from a graphic nightmare,  I have had to remove some music for my I pod player,  because it was causing more problems when I was asleep.

My wife thought it could have been changed in the style or speed of the music, but sometimes it sent me into another nightmare.

My tastes in food has changed quite a lot, something that I grind very odd

Before and after we were married,  I always liked British food and never touched anything like a curry, whether Chinese,  Indian or anything else.

However these days, I love all types of curry, and what is more, the hotter they are, and the spicier, they are the better. I could eat them all day.

The last time we flew to Turkey we were given lunch going out, and breakfast coming back,  but somehow these got mixed up, and I ended up with a Thia curry for Breakfast? 

I confess that this was novel but really enjoyed it. It was not a normal breakfast but it was very nice.

But I simply don't understand how tastes change like this, as it simply does not make any sense at all.

I now understand how carers get upset, when the person that they are caring for, refuses to eat the same foodstuffs,  that they have eaten for many years. 

Obviously, something has changed dramatically inside the brain to cause this, but I dont know what.

My coordination has changed quite a lot too, and this causes many problems, so much so that many hobbies have been stopped.
Life can be stressful so it’s important to find ways of keeping calm and relaxed, classical music is one way but be careful to listen to the right music and stay clam during the day and night when you are struggling to sleep properly 


Wednesday, 7 April 2021

Interesting post about music and dementia

 

Classical music can help slow down the onset of dementia say researchers after discovering Mozart excerpts enhanced gene activity in patients

  • Research saw patients listen to Mozart's violin concert No 3 for 20 minutes
  • The 'musically-experienced' people had enhanced gene activity, it found 
  • Music also affected risk gene synuclein-alpha, connected to Parkinson's
Classical music can help slow down the onset of dementia, new research has found.




Scientists discovered that patients who listened to experts of Mozart had enhanced gene activity in the 
brain in areas including memory and learning.
Meanwhile, the music also affected the activity of a risk gene connected to Parkinson's disease.


The Finnish researchers found the changed activity was only present in 'musically-experienced' patients, who listened to music regularly, suggesting the importance of familiarity with music.
For the study, participants were asked to listen to Mozart's violin concert No 3, G-major, K.216, a piece that lasts 20 minutes. The experiment was carried out on both musically experienced and inexperienced participants.
...
The research involved participants listening to Mozart (pictured) for 20 minutes
The research involved participants listening to Mozart (pictured) for 20 minutes
The study showed that genes were enhanced in those deemed 'musically experienced' in areas such as dopamine secretion, which is when a neurohormone is released in the brain, synaptic neurotransmission, which is how neurons receive information, and learning and memory.
Meanwhile, the music appeared to down-regulate genes associated with neuro-degeneration, which is the progressive loss of the structure or function of neurons.
The researchers said several of the up-regulated genes were ones which are responsible for song learning and singing in songbirds.
This suggests a common evolutionary background of sound perception across different species, they said.
One of the most affected genes in this area was synuclein-alpha (SNCA), which is also a known risk gene for Parkinson's disease. 
Study leader Doctor Irma Jarvela, of Helsinki University, said: 'The up-regulation of several genes that are known to be responsible for song learning and singing in songbirds suggest a shared evolutionary background of sound perception between vocalizing birds and humans.'
He added: 'The effect was only detectable in musically experienced participants, suggesting the importance of familiarity and experience in mediating music-induced effects.'
Dr Jarvela added that the findingscould give give further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying music therapy.
The effects of this are still largely unknown.

Calming music

My tastes in music have changed slightly these days, but while I still like classic music, I now find, that I also like things like Freddie ...